Our Hours:

Monday–Friday: 7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday: 8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Sunday: Closed

 1642 Jefferson Street South, Athens, AL 35611 (256) 232-0698

Posts in Category: The Cat’s Meow

Cat Tails: More Than Meets the Eye

A short-hair, stripped cat with a curled tail, raises a skeptical eye

The feline species comes equipped with some pretty phenomenal capabilities. They can jump up to six times their length, have the largest eyes of any mammal relative to their head size, and have two times as many neurons in the cerebral cortex than dogs. What’s more, they use their whiskers to feel their world around them, and among their 230 bones, the collarbone isn’t connected to other bones, allowing them to squeeze into – and out of – tight spots. 

Cat tails are another aspect of a cat’s incredible anatomy. Their tails help them balance when walking narrow ledges or jumping to high spots, but they are also employed to communicate some of their deepest feelings.

Continue…

Making Biscuits: Why Do Cats Knead?

If you have a feline lap warmer, chances are you’ve also experienced the added bonus of a kitty massage known as “kneading”. The term was presumably coined due to its likeness to kneading bread. And even though your cat is not truly making biscuits, the question still remains: why do cats knead? 

Town and Country Animal Hospital loves cats as much as you do, so we were eager to answer this age old question. 

Continue…

What You Always Wanted to Know About Cat Whiskers

When it comes to cats, you could easily say that sleek design meets high function in virtually every way. Whether it’s their hunting prowess or super self defense capabilities, playtime antics to serious snuggle time, cats know what they want and have the power and drive to get it.

Of course, their distinctly developed anatomy has a lot to do with the beautiful, graceful antics we associate with cats. Springy back legs, excellent hearing, and sharp eyesight notwithstanding, cat whiskers are responsible for helping felines communicate, navigate the dark and figure out small spaces.

Continue…

Scientifically Proven: Pets are Good for You

In our pet-centric culture, it’s not surprising that a variety of businesses allow their employees to bring their four-legged best friends to work. Amazon, Google, Bissell, Nestle Purina, and Ticketmaster are leading the pack when it comes to this trend. They believe it results in lower stress levels, higher productivity, and greater retention. Of course, we’ve known that pets are good for you for a long time, but now, there’s scientific proof!

Relaxing Together

For those of us who have to leave our pets at home during the work day, the good feelings start to flow as soon as we arrive back home. Simply seeing your pet does a lot of good for your heart and soul, and being close with them, feeling their heartbeat, and listening to them breath releases endorphins. Cortisol, the stress hormone, is replaced by oxytocin, the love hormone.

Continue…

Kids and Pets 101: Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Kids and pets are BFFs

Displaying a love for animals, especially dogs and cats, seems to come naturally to most children. For the most part, having a pet (or interacting with one) can be a fun, positive experience for all involved. However, it’s important to ensure the safety and wellbeing of both kids and pets to build a lifelong foundation of love and respect.

Approaching an Animal

When approaching an unfamiliar dog, make sure your child knows to always ask the owner first before petting. If the owner gives permission, the child should offer their hand, palm up, to be sniffed. If the dog seems accepting, your child may stroke their shoulder or chest.

Cats can seem slightly less predictable than dogs, and their body language isn’t always readily obvious to humans. In general, kids should know to let a cat come to them for affection. A cat who’s hissing, lashing their tail, has ears flattened, or one who walks away should be left alone.

Continue…

What You Should Know About Feline Vaccinations

feline vaccinationsWe’re fortunate to live in an era when disease prevention for cats has become a normal way of life. Although feline vaccinations have long been considered one of the easiest and most effective ways to extend the lives of our precious kitties, many owners (understandably) have some questions and concerns.

A Vaccine Primer

Vaccines are designed to help the immune system fight off disease-causing organisms it may come into contact with in the future. Vaccines contain antigens, which are similar enough in structure to a disease-causing virus or bacteria to mildly stimulate the immune system without actually causing the disease. If a cat ever comes into contact with the disease in the future, his or her immune system will be prepared to defend against it.

Continue…